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Features

  • By Dick Frank

    At one time Route 200, just east of I-75, was known as Restaurant Row. Now more and more restaurants are west of the interstate. Just recently several opened at Heath Brook while some east of I-75 have closed. While thinking about what new one to try, feast on some food stories straight from Pun Alley.

    Ham It Up

    In front of new fast-food restaurant a blonde noticed a man holding a sign that read “Free Big Mac!” Strolling over with a look of concern, the blonde asked, “Why? What’d he do?”

  • By Dick Frank

    Fall is coming. Actually a lot of falls have just started and more are coming. Football season has started with college, high school, and exhibition professional games already being played for several weeks. Follow the ball as it gets passed down Pun Alley’s own football field. We make it through the goal posts and sometimes the pun police throw the flag.

  • By Bob Garver

  • By Patricia A. Woodbury RN, MSN

    Infectious diseases, once thought to be on the wane, are making a comeback, driven by widening economic inequality and microbe-vulnerable buildings. There are rising rates of hepatitis A, Legionnaires’ disease and other diseases carried by viruses, bacteria and parasites in the United States. It is not only the poor but the well-off who are at risk, as disease transmission crosses lines of health and wealth.

  • Dr. James L. Snyder

    Normally, I’m not a superstitious sort of a person. But then again there is a good case to be made that I am really not normal. If you stop to think about it, (and I have), the average person is a composite of everybody and the description ends up to be that of nobody. That is exactly what I think about being normal.

  • By Bob Garver

  • By Dick Frank

    In August 1859, well drillers said, “Drill for oil? You mean drill into the ground to try and find oil? You’re crazy.” Nonetheless, Edwin Drake completed the first successful U.S. oil well near Titusville, Pa. at a depth of 69 feet. Now our oil wells can be thousands of feet deep and some oil travels half way around the world to get to us.

    You don’t have to go around the world for today’s humor. Just travel down Pun Alley with me.

  • By Patricia A. Woodbury RN, MSN

    Millions of older adults live with curvature of the spine, yet most do not know they have adult scoliosis.  Your risk for scoliosis obviously does not go away when you become an adult.  According to Dr. R. Douglas Orr at the Cleveland Clinic, “nearly 70% of adults ages 60 and over have evidence of a curved spine on x-ray.”

  • By Bob Garver

  • By Patricia A. Woodbury RN, MSN

    The natural and unnatural disasters we hear on the news may leave us feeling tense, sad, anxious or preoccupied. Overexposure to the news can lead to something called vicarious trauma or compassion fatigue. Dr. Emanuel Maidenberg, PhD, clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA, says, “The sheer volume of stressful events can make people feel pessimistic or fearful.”

  • By James L. Snyder

    I was having a rather down day recently. You know how it is; you are going along 100 miles an hour and finally you crash. I was experiencing one of those reality crashes.

  • By Dick Frank

    In 1819 identical twins donated land to Millsville for a town square and funds towards a new school, provided the town change its name to Twinsburg. Today marks the beginning of Twins Days, held annually on the first full weekend in August in Twinsburg, Ohio, to celebrate biological twins.

    There are always be a number of funny stories involving twins, sometimes when one identical twin is mistaken for the other. Pun Alley takes a look at some of these stories to celebrate the twins’ holiday.

  • By Grandma

    Hi y’all!  You notice these jokes are called “Granny Jokes” because no one calls me “Granny.”  I’ll let you in on some real jokes about me another time. 

  • By Thomas Harris

    The inventor of Hannibal Lector and author of the “The Silence of the Lambs” is back with a new nightmarish thriller. The villain here is a ruthless, hairless evil genius named Hans-Peter Schneider. In his bathroom is a liquid cremation machine for people who don’t work out well like the current occupant--Karla.  Here is a man who has no compunctions about selling people or their organs depending on demand and the bidding price.

  • By Thomas Harris

    The inventor of Hannibal Lector and author of the “The Silence of the Lambs” is back with a new nightmarish thriller. The villain here is a ruthless, hairless evil genius named Hans-Peter Schneider. In his bathroom is a liquid cremation machine for people who don’t work out well like the current occupant--Karla.  Here is a man who has no compunctions about selling people or their organs depending on demand and the bidding price.

  • By Patricia A. Woodbury RN, MSN

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential because the body needs them to function properly but cannot make them. They must come from food. Omega-3 fatty acids have a role in brain function, growth, and development, inflammation and heart health. According to Kristin Kirkpatrick, MS, RD, LD of Cleveland Clinic, omega-3s are good fats that can have an anti-inflammatory effect.

  • Patricia A. Woodbury RN, MSN

    Like most everything else, the way we walk changes as we age.  Maybe you have noticed it in yourself or a friend.  You see a slower step, a slight stagger, or a limp, a shuffle or a tilt.  But how do you know what is normal and what is not?

  • By Grandma

    Even today in 2019, a trip to the moon still seems outrageous to most people; however, in 1969, that feat really seemed unreal. Yes, it was unbelievable; but it happened thanks to the vision of President John F. Kennedy and the 400,000 people who worked endless hours to accomplish what seemed totally unbelievable.

  • Dr. James L. Snyder

    In our house, thunder has a variety of meanings. Some not as good as others, but that is another story. Either way, I am not a fan of thunder.

    Recently, some heavy thunder visited our area along with rain and lightning. I was beginning to understand how Noah felt during his first night in that Ark. Some of the thunder was so loud it seemed like it was inside our house.

    Thankfully, I lost my heebie-jeebies a long time ago.

  • By Dick Frank

    On July 23 1829, William Burt patented a forerunner of the typewriter. The typewriter as we know it, came into being after further development. Even though the typewriter is now history, there are some interesting stories about those who pounded on the keys.

    In the early days, the girl who operated the typewriter was also called a typewriter. “I say, Tom,” said the young business man to his friend, “Where do you buy your typewriter ribbons?”